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Aspire PSHE Curriculum

The education of the whole child is of paramount importance to us and the ASPIRE curriculum in its broadest sense is designed to prepare our students to be the very best they can be as local, national and global citizens of the future. Students also develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to keep themselves healthy and safe, and prepare for life and work in modern Britain.

5 Year Programme

Examples of Assemblies

Subject leader:

  • Clare Kelly
  • clare.kelly@cockshuthill.org.uk

Subject staff:

  • All Teaching Staff

Key Stage 3 curriculum overview:

ASPIRE lessons are designed to help students to grow and develop as people. They will enable them to consider their own lives and how they respond to others. The lessons fit into four areas.

UNICEF lessons focus on the four general principles that impact young people globally. These are discrimination, participation, best interests and life, survival and development. There are clear connections made to the convention on the rights of the child and links to globalisation and sustainability.

Relationships lessons focus on enabling you to build safe and healthy relationships. They consider issues that may affect relationships, how to build positive relationships and how to cope when things go wrong in relationships. Students look at different types of relationships such as friendship or romantic relationships.

Health and Wellbeing lessons focus on strategies for keeping safe. They look at physical and mental health. Students consider issues that may affect them and strategies for coping with these. It includes areas such as drugs, building resilience and Prevent.

Careers lessons focus on helping students to make good choices for their futures. They explain the many options that are available for further study and provide practical support such as writing CV’s.

Throughout the curriculum there are opportunities to think through and develop fundamental British values. For example the rule of law is discussed in Prevent lessons and individual liberty considered in lessons on roles in society.

Key Stage 4 curriculum overview:

ASPIRE lessons are designed to help students to grow and develop as people. They will enable them to consider their own lives and how they respond to others. The lessons fit into four areas.

UNICEF lessons focus on the four general principles that impact young people globally. These are discrimination, participation, best interests and life, survival and development. There are clear connections made to the convention on the rights of the child and links to globalisation and sustainability.

Relationships lessons focus on enabling you to build safe and healthy relationships. They consider issues that may affect relationships, how to build positive relationships and how to cope when things go wrong in relationships. Students look at different types of relationships such as friendship or romantic relationships.

Health and Wellbeing lessons focus on strategies for keeping safe. They look at physical and mental health. Students consider issues that may affect them and strategies for coping with these. It includes areas such as drugs, building resilience and Prevent.

Careers lessons focus on helping students to make good choices for their futures. They explain the many options that are available for further study and provide practical support such as writing CV’s.

Throughout the curriculum there are opportunities to think through and develop fundamental British values. For example the rule of law is discussed in Prevent lessons and the importance of democracy in lessons on Politics.

Assessment in ASPIRE

Assessment is essential to show progress and impact. It also to help pupils to reflect upon their own learning and for some it helps them to see value in the subject.

Assessment in Aspire is ipsative based on the advice of the PSHE Association

“It would be inappropriate for assessment in PSHE education to be about levels or grades, passing or failing. The model of assessment that is most meaningful in PSHE education is ipsative assessment. Ipsative assessment compares where a pupil is at the end of a lesson or series of lessons against where they were before the lesson(s), in a similar way to an athlete measuring today’s performance against their own previous performance. So the benchmark against which progress is measured is the pupil’s own starting point, not the performance of others or the requirements of an exam syllabus.”

To this end, in each Aspire lesson, pupils start by marking how they feel about the topic on a continuum. They then revisit this at the end of the lesson and evaluate the progress they have made.